Place It! landscape workshops

New flyer for Place It! landscape workshops, designed by Prairieform's John Kamp

New flyer for Place It! landscape workshops, designed by Prairieform's John Kamp
New flyer for Place It! landscape workshops, designed by Prairieform’s John Kamp

While we’ve been working with Place It! Interactive Planning for some time, we are now launching a new set of workshops with a specific landscape focus. Through these interactive model-building workshops, participants are able to explore memory and ideas of place and belonging. From there, participants work to build what they would like to see in a landscape, all the while trying to infuse those memories of place and belonging into their designs. The result is design recommendations for design teams and municipalities that not only have greater depth than what would come out of a conventional outreach process (re: merely asking people what they want) but also are the result of a more inclusive and welcoming process, as in these workshops there is no right answer, and everyone has a chance to share, not just the most vocal of the crowd.

We’ve already done landscape workshops for new parks in Oregon, Texas, and Minnesota. And we’re in the midst of doing more. Contact us!

Rethinking the magnolia

Two dead magnolia trees in Alhambra, California. Victims of drought and a lack of foresight.
Two dead magnolia trees in Alhambra, California. Victims of drought and a lack of foresight.

While past peak, the years-long drought in California is showing its effects in slo-mo delay, coming on in the form of many a street tree stressed to the point of just not being able to take it anymore. Nowhere can this phenomenon be seen more than in Southern Calfifornia, where one of the street trees hardest hit has been the southern magnolia / Magnolia grandiflora. A tree native to the rain-abundant American South, it probably never should have been planted in Southern California at all, where rainfall is typically a scant 12 – 15″ during a good year. But, alas, like so many consumer goods, trees come in and out of fashion, regardless of what practical considerations there may be. So in the ’50s and ’60s street upon street were planted with magnolias in places like Hollywood, and Beverly Hills, and Alhambra – all arid regions and all requiring that the magnolias be irrigated generously in order to survive and thrive. So when the watering bans then hit a few years ago and folks were told to let their lawns and parkways go brown, the trees were never ready for the suddenly parched conditions. Many became stressed, and now, some years later, many are dying. As a result, the cooling shade and outdoor-room-creating canopies will be lost, and we will be left with wide streets and excessive sunlight and heat.

A jacaranda, cactus, and yuccas growing and thriving in hot Riverside County.
A jacaranda, cactus, and yuccas growing and thriving in hot Riverside County.

While devastating for the character of so many neighborhoods and the quality of life of our cities, we need to view this loss of trees as an opportunity to rethink what we plant and how. Even before the drought and worsening global warming, LA was a dry place. This simple truism is not going to change in the foreseeable future, and thus we must start planting trees that can handle these hotter and drier conditions – and that can handle them for the long haul. All it takes is a little observation to see which trees are still pushing on and looking good. In the photo above, you can see that this jacaranda – a tree actually not considered one of the most drought tolerant – and its surrounding plants are doing just fine – more than fine – and this is in hot hot Riverside County, in a parkway space surrounded by heat-absorbing asphalt and concrete. What other trees do you see still doing well? What other trees that you haven’t seen could be invited in, to create amazing tree-lined boulevards for the 21st century? Mesquites, acacias, jacarandas, palo verdes, tristanias – and the list goes on. We cannot keep doing what we’ve always done; it’s simply not working, and we’re seeing our lack of foresight in the form of sadly dying trees and sunbaked parkways. Let’s do better this time around.

We are now licensed landscape contractors

Photo of new Prairieform business cards featuring their new California Landscape Contractor license number.
New Prairieform business cards, complete with fancy license number

It’s o-fish, we have passed our exams, are fully bonded and insured, and are now licensed landscape contractors in the state of California. We started out mega-small in Minneapolis, working on my parents’ landscape, and from there things have grown and evolved and led to this. Our goal is to make irrigation-free a reality in California. People say it cannot be done, but we know it can, and the plants and water supplies will thank us for it.

-John Kamp

Weekend Viewing

We wrote about the work of street artist YZ a semi-long while back when she did an installation in the crumbling former nightclub Les Bains in Paris before the whole building was renovated and made sleek and glossy in the way that so much is in our cities of now. What drew us to her work in the first place was its haunting quality, one that was decidedly without sound but somehow resonant at the same time, that spoke to the inevitability of cities crumbling, decaying, and changing, that temporarily froze that space in time before it became something else – something probably altogether less nuanced and textured than what it had been.

In between now and then her career has taken off exponentially, and she was recently chosen to paint the newest version of the French Marianne, which, for the uninitiated, is a national symbol of the French Republic and who personifies both liberty and reason. The image of the Marianne has indeed evolved over the years, and this time is no exception, as now she appears on the entire side of an apartment building in Toulon. Click on the video above to watch the project unfold.