PRAIRIEFORM

Everyday excursions in the urban landscape

Vacant Lands 1

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Prairieform's Vacant Lands Installation in San Francisco's Presidio
A photo of Vacant Lands 1 in San Francisco’s Presidio

Here are the photos from the first Vacant Lands installation, installed in San Francisco’s Presidio as part of the Architecture as Pedestal Exhibition. Thank you to everyone who came by, asked questions, looked, explored, observed. We came up with the idea for the project in 2014, so it’s been a long road from conception to installation, and thus the support and interest were greatly appreciated. Naturally we already have our eyes and mind on the next installation, what it will look like, where it will be, and how you will be able to explore it. Stay tuned. For more info, you may click HERE.

Prairieform's Vacant Lands installation in San Francisco's Presidio

Prairieform's Vacant Lands Installation in San Francisco's Presidio

Vacant Lands installation in SF

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The site for the first Vacant Lands installation by Prairieform in San Francisco's Presidio.

We are spectacularly thrilled to announce that we will be doing our first Vacant Lands installation right here in San Francisco. The installation will be featured as part of the Architecture as Pedestal exhibition, which will be held on October 29 and 30 in the Presidio. To see a video of the site with the glorious fog rolling in, you may visit our Instagram page HERE.

Weeds in eighth-century Japan

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An excerpt from the Collection of Ten-Thousand Leaves, an the oldest collection of Japanese poetry, and which contains a poem that talks about weeds
Excerpt from Collection of Ten-Thousand Leaves, courtesy of Alive in Tokyo

Collection of Ten-Thousand Leaves is the oldest known anthology of Japanese poetry in existence. It was compiled in the middle of the eighth century and contains some unexpectedly relevant glimpses into the lives of ordinary and not-so-ordinary Japanese people, who are living and going about their lives in so much of the same ways that we do now. Given our recent work with Vacant Lands, we could not help but notice and be drawn to one poem in particular, a dialogue poem that makes clear mention of weeds and their real existence in the writer’s life. Beyond the mention of weeds, it is a dear and lovely poem to boot.

It reads as follows:

Had I foreknown my sweet lord’s coming,
My garden, now so rank with wild weeds,
I had strewn it with pearls!

What use to me a house strewn with pearls?
The cottage hidden in wild weeds
Is enough, if I am with you.

From Keene, Donald ed. Anthology of Japanese Literature. New York: Grove Press, 1955.

John Kamp

Wantonly Weedy Wednesday

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An illustration of Hypochaeris radicata, a drought-tolerant, dandelion-like weed that people believe to be originally from Morocco

Hypochaeris radicata, aka cat’s ear or false dandelion, is a wildly prolific plant that has asserted its weedy dominance across much of the globe, now calling Europe, the Americas, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, and Southern Africa home. Originally thought to be native to the Mediterranean regions of Europe, the plant is now thought to be originally from Morocco and then to have made its way northward via human activities such as shipping, trade, and exploration. All parts of the plant are edible, particularly its roots. The larvae of several species of moth call the plant chow, and bees are attracted to its yellow flowers. The plant was discovered in the Vacant Lands Broakland Study Area growing within an unirrigated median on Adeline Street.

Drought-tolerant salad, anyone?

For more info, click here.

John Kamp

Wantonly Weedy Wednesday

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Avena fatua, an annual grass and weed found in the Prairieform Vacantlands Broakland study area, Berkeley, California

We have chosen wild oat (Avena fatua) as our first wanton weed of the Wantonly Weedy Wednesday series. The choice is in part due to the fact that Avena fatua is just such a ubiquitous part of the California landscape. Those golden hillsides you see throughout much of the state are actually painted that color by way of vast seas of Avena fatua, which is non-native annual that has, believe it or not, been present in California for over 200 years. The grass originally made its way to North America as a crop contaminant and can now be found growing in all 50 states. As it is an annual and an aggressive seeder and self-sower, it can quite successfully outcompete native perennial grass populations, particularly in areas that are heavily grazed or disturbed. However, given the fact that it has been found in California since the late 1700s, can we still consider it a non-native grass? At what point does it become native? After 300 years? 400? We have no answers to these questions but merely pose them as wantonly weedy food for thought. Talk amongst yourselves; discuss. For further reading and exploration, click HERE.

John Kamp

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