PRAIRIEFORM

Everyday excursions in the urban landscape

Hope

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dwarf fritillary butterfly caterpillars on passion vine in Oakland, California
Dwarf fritillary butterfly caterpillars on passion vine

In 21st-century California, it is increasingly a luxury of kingly proportions to have a yard of one’s own, especially within one of the state’s major metropolitan areas. As such, container gardening is the only option for many of us, a type of gardening that presents its own set of challenges, not the least of which being watering, as even the most drought-tolerant of plants will require much more watering in a container than they would in the ground. Maintenance reservations aside, I bit the bullet some months ago and started transforming the fire escape/balcony we have here in Oakland into a pollinator garden that is ideally groovy to look at and hang out in as well. To these ends, I planted, among other ‘tings, three kinds of passion vine back in April, hoping to attract the dwarf fritillary butterfly, whose food of choice is the passion vine. Well, as of a month ago, I discovered tiny orange eggs on the vines, and then two weeks ago, these eggs hatched into the tiniest of caterpillars. Since then, the caterpillar children have eaten to their hearts’ content and grown exponentially bigger by the day.

It would be a cliche to say that these are uncertain times we are living in, but, well, the cliche rings true. And in such uncertain times, inviting wildlife intro your landscape in whatever way possible can be a tonic to the lunancy about, serving as a small beacon of hope. What’s not to marvel over that a tiny butterfly would fly around and somehow locate a little patch of passion vine in the middle of dense, urbanized Oakland and decide to make that small patch of green home for its butterfly kids? It is marvel-worthy indeed.

John Kamp

With rains come blooms

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echinops lateritia in bloom at the UC Berkeley Botanical Gardens

With all the rain this year, the cacti at the UC Berkeley Botanical Gardens are putting on quite the show right now. If you have never been, now is the time to go. Not only do you get to see these insanely huge cactus flowers live and in the flesh, but you get to experience sweeping views down a canyon and out into the Bay, with the Golden Gate Bridge just shy of the horizon. And there are newts o plenty swimming in the pond in the Asian Garden area. You will be stupefied by their gentle cuteness. What’s not to love?

John Kamp

We’ve moved!

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Prairieform Landscape and Urban Design has moved to Oakland, California. Here is a photo of our new neighborhood.

We have moved to Oakland! Above is a view from the new office. It inspires daydreaming and calls forth nothing but possibilities.

John Kamp

Have you seen this plant?

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Mystery weed found within the Prairieform Vacant Lands study area in Berkeley, CA

If so, and if you have any ideas as to its proper identity, growth habits, needs, hankerings, please tweet to @prairieform or email us at kamp@prairieform.com.

Weeds in eighth-century Japan

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An excerpt from the Collection of Ten-Thousand Leaves, an the oldest collection of Japanese poetry, and which contains a poem that talks about weeds
Excerpt from Collection of Ten-Thousand Leaves, courtesy of Alive in Tokyo

Collection of Ten-Thousand Leaves is the oldest known anthology of Japanese poetry in existence. It was compiled in the middle of the eighth century and contains some unexpectedly relevant glimpses into the lives of ordinary and not-so-ordinary Japanese people, who are living and going about their lives in so much of the same ways that we do now. Given our recent work with Vacant Lands, we could not help but notice and be drawn to one poem in particular, a dialogue poem that makes clear mention of weeds and their real existence in the writer’s life. Beyond the mention of weeds, it is a dear and lovely poem to boot.

It reads as follows:

Had I foreknown my sweet lord’s coming,
My garden, now so rank with wild weeds,
I had strewn it with pearls!

What use to me a house strewn with pearls?
The cottage hidden in wild weeds
Is enough, if I am with you.

From Keene, Donald ed. Anthology of Japanese Literature. New York: Grove Press, 1955.

John Kamp

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