This is Ann, who has adopted an <i>Aeonium arboreum</i>, which are native to dry, rocky hillsides in the Carary Islands. She will taking care of and monitoring the plant for its water needs in the Jingletown neighborhood of Oakland, CA. This is Jay, who has adopted a <i>Salvia mellifera</i>, which are native to chaparral ecosystems within coastal California between Oakland and San Diego. He will be taking care of and monitoring the plant for its water needs in the Bushrod neighborhood of Oakland, CA.
This is Paul and his mom, Lin, who have adopted a <i>Melica californica</i>, which are native to a variety of ecosystems and climate zones within the state of California. They will be taking care of and monitoring the plant for its water needs in South Berkeley, CA. This is Trena, who has adopted a <i>Salvia munzii</i>, which are native to the southern part of the Peninsular Range in California, and down into Baja California, Mexico. She will be taking care of and monitoring the plant for its water needs in the hills of Richmond, CA.
Trena's <i>Salvia munzii</i> planted in the ground. This is Deana, who has adopted a <i>Nassella pulchra</i>, which are native to grasslands, chaparral, and oak woodlands throughout much of the state of California. This is in fact the California State Grass. She will be taking care of and monitoring the plant for its water needs in the Rockridge neighborhood of Oakland, CA.
This is Shalini, who has adopted an <i>Aeonium arboreum</i>, which are native to dry, rocky hillsides in the Carary Islands. She will taking care of and monitoring the plant for its water needs in Lafayette, CA. This is Sarah, who has adopted a <i>Verbena lasiostachys</i>, which are native to open areas up and down the coast of California and within the state's western-facing foothills of interior mountain ranges. She will be taking care of and monitoring the plant for its water needs in the Mission District of San Francisco, CA.
×

Me

The Adopt-a-Mediterranean-Plant Project is an ongoing citizen-science project created by Prairieform that is an opportunity for people of all backgrounds - design or no design experience, gardening or no gardening experience - to get an up-close and personal look at the water needs of plants from mediterranean climate regions of the world. Out of this project we will not only be able to collectively generate a set of meaningful data about the water needs of these plants, but participants will also become their own experts in drought tolerance, landscapes, and plants from summer-dry climates.

How does it work?

We provide you with a plant from one of the numerous mediterranean climate regions of the world, and then, in return, you agree to care for the plant for a year, keeping track of how much water the plant receives and noting any relevant and meaningful observations. We will check in with you quarterly to get an update on the watering history for the plant, including any onsite rainfall recorded and any photos taken of the plant. After a year of monitoring and caring for our plants, we will have a gathering for all the participants, so we can share stories, observations, and experiences, and ultimately create a body of knowledge and data that can be applied to the creation of new landscapes and drought-tolerant gardening endeavors. This point will also signal when the plants should be ready to grow and thrive on their own without any supplemental watering. A true cause for celebration!

How do I get a plant?

1. Come to an event where we are speaking on irrigation-free landscapes, and we can provide you with one (details on upcoming speaking events always on the Prairieform website). Don't see an upcoming event? Invite us!

2. Get your own plant. Take a photo of yourself with it, and email us with the photo and tell us where you will be growing the plant.

In either case, below are downloadable files on background for the project, tips for planting your plant and measuring water needs, as well as a watering log.

info: kamp@prairieform.com